What’s Up Zo #11: The Winter Blues

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PERSONAL UPDATE

Well…I’m already behind on readings for class…and it’s only week three…

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Other than drowning in readings, things are going pretty well. I’ve decided that after finishing my Masters program I’m going to go into a Doctorate’s program to be Dr. Zo! (Woo-hoo! Another 3-4 years of drowning in readings!)

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Despite the additional hard work I’ll have to add to my plate, I know it’ll be worth it in the end.

Also, I’ve been trying to keep up with exercising so that I might actually have a chance with that half marathon I said I was going to run towards the end of this year with my friend. It surprisingly been pretty decent getting back into the swing of working out. Then again, I’ve basically been doing just cardio to build up some stamina but it’s better than nothing. Also, it’s been helping with the annual winter blues that I usually get around this time of the year so that, along with the personal counseling I’ve been doing has made it all a bit more manageable.

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Still, sometimes I have good days and sometimes I have some bleh days. My therapist suggested getting a light box. It’s basically a light box with a special type of light that has been shown to help people with seasonal affect disorder or most commonly known as seasonal depression. However, the more affordable boxes were either not too high in necessary light strength or had super questionable reviews. Working out has seem to be helping though, so that, along with actually trying to sleep instead of staying up all night trying to binge watch a new show, might help to keep some of the super down days away.

How are you all doing? What are some self care things that you are doing to fight the winter blues?

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Virtually sending you all hugs.

“WHAT ARE YOU READING?”

“Hidden Figures” by Margot Lee Shetterly

25953369“Before John Glenn orbited the earth, or Neil Armstrong walked on the moon, a group of dedicated female mathematicians known as “human computers” used pencils, slide rules and adding machines to calculate the numbers that would launch rockets, and astronauts, into space.

Among these problem-solvers were a group of exceptionally talented African American women, some of the brightest minds of their generation. Originally relegated to teaching math in the South’s segregated public schools, they were called into service during the labor shortages of World War II, when America’s aeronautics industry was in dire need of anyone who had the right stuff. Suddenly, these overlooked math whizzes had a shot at jobs worthy of their skills, and they answered Uncle Sam’s call, moving to Hampton, Virginia and the fascinating, high-energy world of the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory.

Even as Virginia’s Jim Crow laws required them to be segregated from their white counterparts, the women of Langley’s all-black “West Computing” group helped America achieve one of the things it desired most: a decisive victory over the Soviet Union in the Cold War, and complete domination of the heavens.

Starting in World War II and moving through to the Cold War, the Civil Rights Movement and the Space Race, Hidden Figures follows the interwoven accounts of Dorothy Vaughan, Mary Jackson, Katherine Johnson and Christine Darden, four African American women who participated in some of NASA’s greatest successes. It chronicles their careers over nearly three decades they faced challenges, forged alliances and used their intellect to change their own lives, and their country’s future.”

“The Circle” by Dave Eggers

41-nh0h4ahl-_sx324_bo1204203200_“When Mae Holland is hired to work for the Circle, the world’s most powerful internet company, she feels she’s been given the opportunity of a lifetime. The Circle, run out of a sprawling California campus, links users’ personal emails, social media, banking, and purchasing with their universal operating system, resulting in one online identity and a new age of civility and transparency. As Mae tours the open-plan office spaces, the towering glass dining facilities, the cozy dorms for those who spend nights at work, she is thrilled with the company’s modernity and activity. There are parties that last through the night, there are famous musicians playing on the lawn, there are athletic activities and clubs and brunches, and even an aquarium of rare fish retrieved from the Marianas Trench by the CEO. Mae can’t believe her luck, her great fortune to work for the most influential company in the world—even as life beyond the campus grows distant, even as a strange encounter with a colleague leaves her shaken, even as her role at the Circle becomes increasingly public. What begins as the captivating story of one woman’s ambition and idealism soon becomes a heart-racing novel of suspense, raising questions about memory, history, privacy, democracy, and the limits of human knowledge.”

“Himself” by Jess Kidd

29365635“Having been abandoned on the steps of an orphanage as an infant, lovable car thief and Dublin charmer Mahony assumed all his life that his mother had simply given him up. But when he receives an anonymous note suggesting that foul play may have led to his mother’s disappearance, he sees only one option: to return to the rural Irish village where he was born and find out what really happened twenty-six years ago.

From the moment he sets foot in Mulderrig, Mahony’s presence turns the village upside down. His uncannily familiar face and outsider ways cause a stir among the locals, who receive him with a mixture of excitement (the women), curiosity (the men), and suspicion (the pious).

Determined to uncover the truth about what happened to his mother, Mahony solicits the help of brash anarchist and retired theater actress Mrs. Cauley. This improbable duo concocts an ingenious plan to get the town talking about the day Mahony’s mother disappeared and are aided and abetted by a cast of eccentric characters, both living and dead.

Himself is a simmering mixture—a blend of the natural everyday and the supernatural, folklore and mystery, and a healthy dose of quintessentially Irish humor. The result is a darkly comic crime story in the tradition of a classic Irish trickster tale, complete with a twisting and turning plot, a small-town rife with secrets, and an infectious love of language and storytelling that is a hallmark of the finest Irish writers.”

THE SONG I JUST KEEP REPEATING…

“Shape of You” by Ed Sheeran

YES!!! It’s been so long since we’ve heard from the bae!!!

Well, that’s all for now, folks! Until next time!

This is my own version of the Sunday Post by Caffeinated Book Reviewer. Don’t forget to check out the posts of others there!

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